Aristotle’s Rhetoric, Book II, Chapters 6-14
                                            (Kennedy: pp. 143-169; Roberts: pp. 51-62)

                                   Book II: Study Questions 11-20

11. Before whom does Aristotle think a person will feel the most shame (pp.144-149)?
How might an orator use this information in a speech intended to shame someone in
public?

12. How does Aristotle describe the virtue of kharis, or "kindliness," the New Testament
(Greek) word for "grace" (pp. 149-151)?

13. How does Aristotle define eleos, or "pity" (pp. 151-155)?

14. Why do the "newly rich" cause more indignation among the less fortunate than
"those wealthy for a long time" (pp. 155-158)?

15. According to Aristotle, what causes envy (pp. 158-160)?

16. What objects seem to be worthy of emulation to Aristotle (pp. 160-162)?  Can you
think of any situations in which a speaker might refer to these in a public speech?

17. How does the editor, G. Kennedy, explain Aristotle's purpose for studying the
emotions of an audience (pp. 119; 122-124)? Does Kennedy's explanation seem to fit
Aristotle's philosophy of rhetoric? If Kennedy is correct, does Aristotle's rationale
seem legitimate?

18. How does Aristotle describe the character of the young (pp.163-166)?   Do Aristotle's
insights about young people seem valid today? If so, how could an orator (e.g. a politician
or a salesperson) use this information, for good or for evil, in a speech to young people?

19. How does Aristotle describe the character of the old (pp. 166-168)? Do Aristotle's
insights about old people seem valid today? If so, how could an orator (e.g. a political
candidate) use this information, for good or for evil, in a speech to old people?

20. How does Aristotle describe the character of people in the prime of life (pp.168-69)?
Do Aristotle's insights about people in their prime seem valid today? If so, how could an
orator (e.g. a salesperson or a political candidate) use this information, for good or for
evil, in a speech to people in their prime?